Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

August 5, 1997
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M101: The Pinwheel Galaxy
Credit: W. Keel (U. Alabama in Tuscaloosa), KPNO, 4-m Mayall Telescope

Explanation: Why do many galaxies appear as spirals? A striking example is M101, shown above, whose relatively close distance of about 22 million light years allow it to be studied in some detail. Recent evidence indicates that a close gravitational interaction with a neighboring galaxy created waves of high mass and condensed gas which continue to circle the galaxy. These waves compress existing gas and cause star formation. One result is that M101, also called the Pinwheel Galaxy, has several extremely bright star-forming regions (called HII regions) spread across its spiral arms. M101 is so large that its immense gravity distorts smaller nearby galaxies.

Tomorrow's picture: Hale-Bopp from Indian Cove

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Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (USRA)
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